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Overview
Comment:Changes to comments. In particular, a lengthy comment was added to encode.c that explains how the encoder algorithm works. (CVS 966)
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Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1: 8b388b2f690dbfd50eefc0fdede1c7785f78afa1
User & Date: drh 2003-05-10 03:36:54
Context
2003-05-11
20:07
Changed ".databases" command to use PRAGMA database_list. (CVS 967) check-in: bad20653 user: jplyon tags: trunk
2003-05-10
03:36
Changes to comments. In particular, a lengthy comment was added to encode.c that explains how the encoder algorithm works. (CVS 966) check-in: 8b388b2f user: drh tags: trunk
03:04
Removed never-used symbol SQLITE_ResultDetails. (CVS 965) check-in: 26bd7bb1 user: jplyon tags: trunk
Changes
Hide Diffs Unified Diffs Ignore Whitespace Patch

Changes to src/auth.c.

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**
*************************************************************************
** This file contains code used to implement the sqlite_set_authorizer()
** API.  This facility is an optional feature of the library.  Embedded
** systems that do not need this facility may omit it by recompiling
** the library with -DSQLITE_OMIT_AUTHORIZATION=1
**
** $Id: auth.c,v 1.9 2003/05/02 14:32:13 drh Exp $
*/
#include "sqliteInt.h"

/*
** All of the code in this file may be omitted by defining a single
** macro.
*/
#ifndef SQLITE_OMIT_AUTHORIZATION

/*
** Set or clear the access authorization function.
**
** The access authorization function is be called during the compilation
** phase to verify that the user has read and/or write access permission
** various fields of the database.  The first argument to the auth function
** is a copy of the 3rd argument to this routine.  The second argument
** to the auth function is one of these constants:
**
**        SQLITE_READ_COLUMN
**        SQLITE_WRITE_COLUMN







**        SQLITE_DELETE_ROW








**        SQLITE_INSERT_ROW





**
** The third and fourth arguments to the auth function are the name of
** the table and the column that are being accessed.  The auth function
** should return either SQLITE_OK, SQLITE_DENY, or SQLITE_IGNORE.  If
** SQLITE_OK is returned, it means that access is allowed.  SQLITE_DENY
** means that the SQL statement will never-run - the sqlite_exec() call
** will return with an error.  SQLITE_IGNORE means that the SQL statement







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**
*************************************************************************
** This file contains code used to implement the sqlite_set_authorizer()
** API.  This facility is an optional feature of the library.  Embedded
** systems that do not need this facility may omit it by recompiling
** the library with -DSQLITE_OMIT_AUTHORIZATION=1
**
** $Id: auth.c,v 1.10 2003/05/10 03:36:54 drh Exp $
*/
#include "sqliteInt.h"

/*
** All of the code in this file may be omitted by defining a single
** macro.
*/
#ifndef SQLITE_OMIT_AUTHORIZATION

/*
** Set or clear the access authorization function.
**
** The access authorization function is be called during the compilation
** phase to verify that the user has read and/or write access permission on
** various fields of the database.  The first argument to the auth function
** is a copy of the 3rd argument to this routine.  The second argument
** to the auth function is one of these constants:
**
**       SQLITE_COPY
**       SQLITE_CREATE_INDEX
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TABLE
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TEMP_INDEX
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TEMP_TABLE
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TEMP_TRIGGER
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TEMP_VIEW
**       SQLITE_CREATE_TRIGGER
**       SQLITE_CREATE_VIEW
**       SQLITE_DELETE
**       SQLITE_DROP_INDEX
**       SQLITE_DROP_TABLE
**       SQLITE_DROP_TEMP_INDEX
**       SQLITE_DROP_TEMP_TABLE
**       SQLITE_DROP_TEMP_TRIGGER
**       SQLITE_DROP_TEMP_VIEW
**       SQLITE_DROP_TRIGGER
**       SQLITE_DROP_VIEW
**       SQLITE_INSERT
**       SQLITE_PRAGMA
**       SQLITE_READ
**       SQLITE_SELECT
**       SQLITE_TRANSACTION
**       SQLITE_UPDATE
**
** The third and fourth arguments to the auth function are the name of
** the table and the column that are being accessed.  The auth function
** should return either SQLITE_OK, SQLITE_DENY, or SQLITE_IGNORE.  If
** SQLITE_OK is returned, it means that access is allowed.  SQLITE_DENY
** means that the SQL statement will never-run - the sqlite_exec() call
** will return with an error.  SQLITE_IGNORE means that the SQL statement

Changes to src/encode.c.

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*************************************************************************
** This file contains helper routines used to translate binary data into
** a null-terminated string (suitable for use in SQLite) and back again.
** These are convenience routines for use by people who want to store binary
** data in an SQLite database.  The code in this file is not used by any other
** part of the SQLite library.
**
** $Id: encode.c,v 1.5 2003/01/19 03:59:46 drh Exp $
*/
#include <string.h>

















































































/*
** Encode a binary buffer "in" of size n bytes so that it contains
** no instances of characters '\'' or '\000'.  The output is 
** null-terminated and can be used as a string value in an INSERT
** or UPDATE statement.  Use sqlite_decode_binary() to convert the
** string back into its original binary.







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*************************************************************************
** This file contains helper routines used to translate binary data into
** a null-terminated string (suitable for use in SQLite) and back again.
** These are convenience routines for use by people who want to store binary
** data in an SQLite database.  The code in this file is not used by any other
** part of the SQLite library.
**
** $Id: encode.c,v 1.6 2003/05/10 03:36:54 drh Exp $
*/
#include <string.h>

/*
** How This Encoder Works
**
** The output is allowed to contain any character except 0x27 (') and
** 0x00.  This is accomplished by using an escape character to encode
** 0x27 and 0x00 as a two-byte sequence.  The escape character is always
** 0x01.  An 0x00 is encoded as the two byte sequence 0x01 0x01.  The
** 0x27 character is encoded as the two byte sequence 0x01 0x03.  Finally,
** the escape character itself is encoded as the two-character sequence
** 0x01 0x02.
**
** To summarize, the encoder works by using an escape sequences as follows:
**
**       0x00  ->  0x01 0x01
**       0x01  ->  0x01 0x02
**       0x27  ->  0x01 0x03
**
** If that were all the encoder did, it would work, but in certain cases
** it could double the size of the encoded string.  For example, to
** encode a string of 100 0x27 character would require 100 instances of
** the 0x01 0x03 escape sequence resulting in a 200-character output.
** We would prefer to keep the size of the encoded string smaller than
** this.
**
** To minimize the encoding size, we first add a fixed offset value to each 
** byte in the sequence.  The addition is module 256.  (That is to say, if
** the sum of the original character value and the offset exceeds 256, then
** the higher order bits are truncated.)  The offset is chosen to minimize
** the number of characters in the string that need to be escaped.  For
** example, in the case above where the string was composed of 100 0x27
** characters, the offset might be 0x01.  Each of the 0x27 characters would
** then be converted into an 0x28 character which would not need to be
** escaped at all and so the 100 character input string would be converted
** into just 100 characters of output.  Actually 101 characters of output - 
** we have to record the offset used as the first byte in the sequence so
** that the string can be decoded.  Since the offset value is stored as
** part of the output string and the output string is not allowed to contain
** characters 0x00 or 0x27, the offset cannot be 0x00 or 0x27.
**
** Here, then, are the encoding steps:
**
**     (1)   Choose an offset value and make it the first character of
**           output.
**
**     (2)   Copy each input character into the output buffer, one by
**           one, adding the offset value as you copy.
**
**     (3)   If the value of an input character plus offset is 0x00, replace
**           that one character by the two-character sequence 0x01 0x01.
**           If the sum is 0x01, replace it with 0x01 0x02.  If the sum
**           is 0x27, replace it with 0x01 0x03.
**
**     (4)   Put a 0x00 terminator at the end of the output.
**
** Decoding is obvious:
**
**     (5)   Copy encoded characters except the first into the decode 
**           buffer.  Set the first encoded character aside for use as
**           the offset in step 7 below.
**
**     (6)   Convert each 0x01 0x01 sequence into a single character 0x00.
**           Convert 0x01 0x02 into 0x01.  Convert 0x01 0x03 into 0x27.
**
**     (7)   Subtract the offset value that was the first character of
**           the encoded buffer from all characters in the output buffer.
**
** The only tricky part is step (1) - how to compute an offset value to
** minimize the size of the output buffer.  This is accomplished to testing
** all offset values and picking the one that results in the fewest number
** of escapes.  To do that, we first scan the entire input and count the
** number of occurances of each character value in the input.  Suppose
** the number of 0x00 characters is N(0), the number of occurances of 0x01
** is N(1), and so forth up to the number of occurances of 0xff is N(256).
** An offset of 0 is not allowed so we don't have to test it.  The number
** of escapes required for an offset of 1 is N(1)+N(2)+N(40).  The number
** of escapes required for an offset of 2 is N(2)+N(3)+N(41).  And so forth.
** In this way we find the offset that gives the minimum number of escapes,
** and thus minimizes the length of the output string.
*/

/*
** Encode a binary buffer "in" of size n bytes so that it contains
** no instances of characters '\'' or '\000'.  The output is 
** null-terminated and can be used as a string value in an INSERT
** or UPDATE statement.  Use sqlite_decode_binary() to convert the
** string back into its original binary.

Changes to src/vdbe.c.

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**
** Various scripts scan this source file in order to generate HTML
** documentation, headers files, or other derived files.  The formatting
** of the code in this file is, therefore, important.  See other comments
** in this file for details.  If in doubt, do not deviate from existing
** commenting and indentation practices when changing or adding code.
**
** $Id: vdbe.c,v 1.221 2003/05/02 14:32:14 drh Exp $
*/
#include "sqliteInt.h"
#include <ctype.h>

/*
** The makefile scans this source file and creates the following
** array of string constants which are the names of all VDBE opcodes.
................................................................................
  }
  POPSTACK;
  break;
}

/* Opcode: OpenTemp P1 P2 *
**
** Open a new cursor that points to a table or index in a temporary
** database file.  The temporary file is opened read/write even if 
** the main database is read-only.  The temporary file is deleted
** when the cursor is closed.
**
** The cursor points to a BTree table if P2==0 and to a BTree index
** if P2==1.  A BTree table must have an integer key and can have arbitrary
** data.  A BTree index has no data but can have an arbitrary key.
**
** This opcode is used for tables that exist for the duration of a single
** SQL statement only.  Tables created using CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE
** are opened using OP_OpenAux or OP_OpenWrAux.  "Temporary" in the
** context of this opcode means for the duration of a single SQL statement
** whereas "Temporary" in the context of CREATE TABLE means for the duration
** of the connection to the database.  Same word; different meanings.
*/
case OP_OpenTemp: {
  int i = pOp->p1;
  Cursor *pCx;
................................................................................
  if( pOp->p2 ) db->nChange++;
  break;
}

/* Opcode: KeyAsData P1 P2 *
**
** Turn the key-as-data mode for cursor P1 either on (if P2==1) or
** off (if P2==0).  In key-as-data mode, the Field opcode pulls
** data off of the key rather than the data.  This is useful for
** processing compound selects.
*/
case OP_KeyAsData: {
  int i = pOp->p1;
  assert( i>=0 && i<p->nCursor );
  p->aCsr[i].keyAsData = pOp->p2;
  break;







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**
** Various scripts scan this source file in order to generate HTML
** documentation, headers files, or other derived files.  The formatting
** of the code in this file is, therefore, important.  See other comments
** in this file for details.  If in doubt, do not deviate from existing
** commenting and indentation practices when changing or adding code.
**
** $Id: vdbe.c,v 1.222 2003/05/10 03:36:54 drh Exp $
*/
#include "sqliteInt.h"
#include <ctype.h>

/*
** The makefile scans this source file and creates the following
** array of string constants which are the names of all VDBE opcodes.
................................................................................
  }
  POPSTACK;
  break;
}

/* Opcode: OpenTemp P1 P2 *
**
** Open a new cursor to a transient table.
** The transient cursor is always opened read/write even if 
** the main database is read-only.  The transient table is deleted
** automatically when the cursor is closed.
**
** The cursor points to a BTree table if P2==0 and to a BTree index
** if P2==1.  A BTree table must have an integer key and can have arbitrary
** data.  A BTree index has no data but can have an arbitrary key.
**
** This opcode is used for tables that exist for the duration of a single
** SQL statement only.  Tables created using CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE
** are opened using OP_OpenRead or OP_OpenWrite.  "Temporary" in the
** context of this opcode means for the duration of a single SQL statement
** whereas "Temporary" in the context of CREATE TABLE means for the duration
** of the connection to the database.  Same word; different meanings.
*/
case OP_OpenTemp: {
  int i = pOp->p1;
  Cursor *pCx;
................................................................................
  if( pOp->p2 ) db->nChange++;
  break;
}

/* Opcode: KeyAsData P1 P2 *
**
** Turn the key-as-data mode for cursor P1 either on (if P2==1) or
** off (if P2==0).  In key-as-data mode, the OP_Column opcode pulls
** data off of the key rather than the data.  This is used for
** processing compound selects.
*/
case OP_KeyAsData: {
  int i = pOp->p1;
  assert( i>=0 && i<p->nCursor );
  p->aCsr[i].keyAsData = pOp->p2;
  break;