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Comment:Updates to the About document.
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SHA1: 1e99bb882867dce45ebc29f2e6187f7b5006a499
User & Date: drh 2008-11-30 01:58:52
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2008-11-30
13:09
Fix typos and poor wording in the about.wiki document. check-in: f30534fbb0 user: drh tags: trunk
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Updates to the About document. check-in: 1e99bb8828 user: drh tags: trunk
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First sample prototype script with its generator. check-in: c7bfa7e3cf user: drh tags: trunk
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<h1>About Sqllogictest</h1>

Sqllogictest is a program designed to test the
[http://www.sqlite.org/ | SQLite] database engine to verify that it computes
the same results as other SQL database engines such as MySQL, PostgreSQL,
Firebird, MS-SQL, Informix, DB2, Oracle, and so forth.  Sqllogictest is



concerned only with correct results.  No attention is paid to performance,
optimal use of indices, disk and memory usage, transactional behavior,
or concurrancy and locking issues.  
The sqllogictest program seeks to answer just one question:

<blockquote><i>
Does the database engine compute the correct answer to queries.
</i></blockquote>




The sqllogictest program is designed to validate SQLite.  But it is really
database engine neutral and can just as easily be used to validate the SQL
logic of any other SQL database engine by comparing computed result against
its peers.





<h2>Operation</h2>

The sqllogictest program is driven by scripts containing SQL statements
and queries and, sometimes, query results.  A script that omits the
results is called a "prototype script".  A script that includes results
is a "test script".

The sqllogictest program operates in two modes:  script completion mode
and script validation mode.  In script completion mode, the sqllogictest
program reads a prototype script and runs the statements and queries against
a reference database engine.  The output is a test script that is a copy
of the prototype script with result inserted.  In validation mode,

the sqllogictest program reads a test script and runs the statements and
queries contained therein against a database engine under test.  The results
received back from the database engine are compared against the results
in the test script to validate the output of the database engine.

For example, to verify that SQLite gets the same answer as MySQL on
a particular set of queries, one might execute commands as follows.
First complete the prototype script using MySQL as the reference database
engine:

<blockquote><pre>
................................................................................

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -verify -engine SQLite full.test
</pre></blockquote>

The second command will display any discrepencies between the output
generated by SQLite and the reference data that was generated by MySQL
in the first command.



Another approach to validation is to run the competion step separately
for each database engine and save the output in separate test scripts.
The compare the two test scripts using a file comparison utility.
For example:

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -engine MySQL prototype.test >full-1.test
sqllogictest -engine SQLite prototype.test >full-2.test
diff full-1.test full-2.test
</pre></blockquote>

Note that in completion mode, the sqllogictest program will ignore any
result value contained in its input script.  Or, in other words, it is
safe to pass a full test script into sqllogictest running in completion
mode.  So the previous test could have been run this way:

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -engine MySQL prototype.test >full-1.test
sqllogictest -engine SQLite full-1.test >full-2.test
diff full-1.test full-2.test
</pre></blockquote>

The long-term vision of the sqllogictest project is to amass a huge 
collection of prototype scripts.  Many of the prototype scripts will
be very large, being automatically generated by some dynamic language
like Tcl, or Perl.  Prototype scripts will try queries using all kinds
of combinations on constraints and column orders, in order to exercize

as many paths through the logic of the database engine as possible.

<h2>Script Format</h2>

Scripts are line-oriented ASCII text files.  
No provision is made for Unicode; the purpose
of sqllogictest is to test the query and join logic of the database engine, not
its support for localization and internationalization.

Scripts consist of zero or more records.  A record represents either a
single statement or query.  Each record
is separated from its neighbors by one or more blank line.  Records
are evaluated in order, starting from the beginning of the
script and working toward the end.

Lines of the script that being with the sharp character ("#", ASCCI code 35)

are comment lines and are ignored.  Comment lines are not considered blank
lines and cannot be used to separate records.  Comments
typically occur at the beginning of a record, but they are
allowed to occur in the middle of a record.  Comments
that occurs in the middle of an SQL statement are stripped from the
statement prior to the statement being sent to the database engine for
evaluation.  Comments are logically removed from the script by a preprocessor.
Hence, in the sequal, when we speak of the "first line of a record" we
really mean the "first non-comment line of a record".

Each record is either a statement or a query.  A statement is an SQL
command that is to be evaluated but from which we do not expect to get
results (other than success or failure).  A statement might be a
CREATE TABLE or an INSERT or an UPDATE or a DROP INDEX.  A query is an
SQL command from which we expect to receive results.  The result set
................................................................................
of thinking about completion mode is that it copies the script from
input to output, replacing all "----" lines and subsequent result values
with the actual results from running the query.

The &lt;type-string&gt; argument to the query statement is a short string
that specifies the number of result columns and the expected datatype
of each result column.  There is one character in the &lt;type-string&gt;
for each result column.  The characters is "T" for a text result,
"I" for an integer result, and "R" for a floating-point result.

The &lt;sort-mode&gt; argument is optional.  If included, it must be
one of "nosort", "rowsort", or "valuesort".  The default is "nosort".
In nosort mode, the results appear in esactly the order in which they
were received from the database engine.  The nosort mode should only
be used on queries that have an ORDER BY clause or which only have a
single row of result, since otherwise the order of results is undefined
and might vary from one database engine to another.  The "rowsort" mode
gathers all output from the database engine then sorts it by rows on
the client side.  Sort comparisons use memcmp() on the rendered ASCII
text representation of the values.  Hence, "9" sorts after "10", not before.
The "valuesort" mode works like rowsort except that it does not honor
row groupings.  Each individual result value is sorted on its own.

In the results section, integer values are rendered as if by
printf("%d").  Floating point values are rendered as if by
printf("%.3f").  NULL values are rendered as "NULL".  Empty
strings are rendered as "(empty)".  Within non-empty strings,
all control characters and unprintable characters are rendered as "@".









































































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<h1>About Sqllogictest</h1>

Sqllogictest is a program designed to verify that an SQL database engine
computes correct results to queries by comparing the results to identical
queries submitted to other SQL database engines.  Sqllogictest was originally
designed to test [http://www.sqlite.org/ | SQLite], but it is database engine
neutral and can just as easily be used to test other database products.

Sqllogictest is concerned only with correct results.  
No attention is paid to performance,
optimal use of indices, disk and memory usage, transactional behavior,
or concurrancy and locking issues.  
The sqllogictest program seeks to answer just one question:

<blockquote><i>
Does the database engine compute the correct answer.
</i></blockquote>

Every SQL database engine has test vectors used to validate its operation.
These manually generated test vectors are important.  But generating
test vectors is tedious, since the correct solutions must be computed
and verifed by hand.  The sqllogictest program is designed to sidestep



this tedium by using independently developed database engines generate
the reference test results automatically.  This allows millions of test 
vectors to be producted by simple scripts, which in turn provides much 
more thorough and complete testing of the database engine.

<h2>Operation</h2>

The sqllogictest program is driven by test scripts containing SQL statements
and queries and, sometimes, query results.  A test script that omits the
results is called a "prototype script".  A test script that includes results
is a "full script".

The sqllogictest program operates in two modes:  test script completion mode
and test script validation mode.  In test script completion mode, the
sqllogictest program reads a prototype script and runs the statements 
and queries against a reference database engine.  The output is a 
full script that is a copy of the prototype script with result inserted.  
In validation mode, 
the sqllogictest program reads a full script and runs the statements and
queries contained therein against a database engine under test.  The results
received back from the database engine are compared against the results
in the full script to validate the output of the database engine.

For example, to verify that SQLite gets the same answer as MySQL on
a particular set of queries, one might execute commands as follows.
First complete the prototype script using MySQL as the reference database
engine:

<blockquote><pre>
................................................................................

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -verify -engine SQLite full.test
</pre></blockquote>

The second command will display any discrepencies between the output
generated by SQLite and the reference data that was generated by MySQL
in the first command.  Notice that the default mode of operation for
sqllogictest is completion mode.  The -verify command-line option is used
to activate validation mode.

Another approach to validation is to run the competion step separately
for each database engine and save the output in separate test scripts.
Then compare the two test scripts using a file comparison utility.
For example:

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -engine MySQL prototype.test >full-1.test
sqllogictest -engine SQLite prototype.test >full-2.test
diff full-1.test full-2.test
</pre></blockquote>

Note that in completion mode, the sqllogictest program will ignore any
result value contained in its input test script.  Or, in other words, it is
safe to pass a full test script into sqllogictest running in completion
mode.  So the previous test could have been run this way:

<blockquote><pre>
sqllogictest -engine MySQL prototype.test >full-1.test
sqllogictest -engine SQLite full-1.test >full-2.test
diff full-1.test full-2.test
</pre></blockquote>

The long-term vision of the sqllogictest project is to amass a huge 
collection of prototype scripts.  Many of the prototype scripts will
be very large, being automatically generated by some dynamic language
like Tcl or Perl.  Prototype scripts will try queries using all kinds
and combinations of constraints, column orders, joins, indexes, and
so forth in order to exercize as many paths through the logic of the 
database engine as possible.

<h2>Test-Script Format</h2>

Test scripts are line-oriented ASCII text files.  
No provision is made for Unicode; the purpose
of sqllogictest is to test the query and join logic of the database engine, not
its support for localization and internationalization.

Test scripts consist of zero or more records.  A record represents either a
single statement or query.  Each record
is separated from its neighbors by one or more blank line.  Records
are evaluated in order, starting from the beginning of the
script and working toward the end.

Lines of the test script that begin with the sharp character
("#", ASCII code 35)
are comment lines and are ignored.  Comment lines are not considered blank
lines and cannot be used to separate records.  Comments
typically occur at the beginning of a record, but they are
allowed to occur in the middle of a record.  Comments
that occurs in the middle of an SQL statement are stripped from the
statement prior to the statement being sent to the database engine for
evaluation.  Comments are logically removed from the script by a preprocessor.
Hence, when we speak of the "first line of a record" we
really mean the "first non-comment line of a record".

Each record is either a statement or a query.  A statement is an SQL
command that is to be evaluated but from which we do not expect to get
results (other than success or failure).  A statement might be a
CREATE TABLE or an INSERT or an UPDATE or a DROP INDEX.  A query is an
SQL command from which we expect to receive results.  The result set
................................................................................
of thinking about completion mode is that it copies the script from
input to output, replacing all "----" lines and subsequent result values
with the actual results from running the query.

The &lt;type-string&gt; argument to the query statement is a short string
that specifies the number of result columns and the expected datatype
of each result column.  There is one character in the &lt;type-string&gt;
for each result column.  The characters codes are "T" for a text result,
"I" for an integer result, and "R" for a floating-point result.

The &lt;sort-mode&gt; argument is optional.  If included, it must be
one of "nosort", "rowsort", or "valuesort".  The default is "nosort".
In nosort mode, the results appear in exactly the order in which they
were received from the database engine.  The nosort mode should only
be used on queries that have an ORDER BY clause or which only have a
single row of result, since otherwise the order of results is undefined
and might vary from one database engine to another.  The "rowsort" mode
gathers all output from the database engine then sorts it by rows on
the client side.  Sort comparisons use strcmp() on the rendered ASCII
text representation of the values.  Hence, "9" sorts after "10", not before.
The "valuesort" mode works like rowsort except that it does not honor
row groupings.  Each individual result value is sorted on its own.

In the results section, integer values are rendered as if by
printf("%d").  Floating point values are rendered as if by
printf("%.3f").  NULL values are rendered as "NULL".  Empty
strings are rendered as "(empty)".  Within non-empty strings,
all control characters and unprintable characters are rendered as "@".

<h2>Suggestions For Generating Test-Scripts</h2>

When sqllogictest runs a test script, it begins with a completely
empty database.  So the first few records of any test script will
typically be CREATE statements of various kinds and expecially
CREATE TABLE statements.  In order to maximize the portability of
scripts across database engines, it is suggested that test scripts stick 
to the basic CREATE TABLE syntax.  Use only a few common datatypes
such as:

  *  INTEGER
  *  VARCHAR(30)
  *  REAL

Remember, the purpose of sqllogictest is to validate the logic behind
the evaluation of SQL statements, not the ability to handle extreme values.
So keep content in a reasonable range:  small integers, short strings, and
floating point numbers that use only the most significant bits of an
a 32-bit IEEE float.

After creating one or more tables and populating them with test data,
use a dynamic language (TCL, Perl, Python, Ruby) to implement a templating 
scheme that will generate thousands or millions of separate queries.  
Use a pseudo-random number
generator (PRNG) to fill in the templates at random.  Seed the PRNG
with a constant at the beginning of the dynamic-language program
so that rerunning the program will generate the same test-script 
every time.

In the dynamic-language programs that generate test scripts, it is useful
to have subroutines that compute elements such as the following:

  *  Randomly permute the elements of a result set.

  *  Choose a random subset of columns in a table to be updated.

  *  Generate a random WHERE clause.

  *  Generate a random string literal of some maximum length.

  *  Generate a random identifier which is not a keyword.

Use LIMIT and OFFSET clauses to keep results set sizes under control.
It is recommented that most queries use an ORDER BY clause so that
the order of values in the output is deterministic.  Of course, it
is also desirable to have some test cases that omit ORDER BY.  In those
cases use either the "rowsort" or "valuesort" modifiers at the beginning
of the query record to ensure that the output appears in the same order
on all database engines.

A typical test script will begin with some CREATE statements followed by
some INSERT statements to add initial data.  This is followed by
thousands of randomly generate UPDATE, DELETE, and INSERT statements.
Several SELECT statements typical follow each UPDATE, DELETE, or INSERT
in order to verify that the content of the database is as expected.

It is useful to includes some NULL values in the initial data in order to
test the NULL handling logic.  Be careful, however, in that different
database engines interpret NULLs in a UNIQUE constraint differently.
SQLite, PostgreSQL, Oracle, MySQL, and Firebird do it one way.  Informix,
DB2, and MS-SQL do it another.  So while NULLs are useful test values, it
will be best to avoid using NULLs in UNIQUE columns.

One might have a large set of DELETE, INSERT, SELECT, and UPDATE statements
that are repeated multiple times, but with various CREATE INDEX and
DROP INDEX statements in between each iteration.  Such tests seeks to
prove that the same results appear regardless of whether or not indices
are present.  Remember, the purpose of sqllogictest is to verify that the
database engine gets correct results, not that it makes effective use
of indices.