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Artifact 2b6aae95eb703e3ecf3b9f35e2f25799907cad84:


hash-threshold 8

statement ok
CREATE TABLE t1( x INTEGER, y VARCHAR(8) )

statement ok
INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(1,'true')

statement ok
INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(0,'false')

statement ok
INSERT INTO t1 VALUES(NULL,'NULL')

statement ok
CREATE INDEX t1i1 ON t1(x)


# EVIDENCE-OF: R-38515-45264 An UPDATE statement is used to modify a
# subset of the values stored in zero or more rows of the database table
# identified by the qualified-table-name specified as part of the UPDATE
# statement.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=1 WHERE x>0

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=2 WHERE x>0

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET y='true' WHERE x>0

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET y='unknown' WHERE x>0

statement error
UPDATE t1 SET z='foo'

statement error
UPDATE t1 SET z='foo' WHERE x>0

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-55869-30521 If the UPDATE statement does not have a
# WHERE clause, all rows in the table are modified by the UPDATE.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=3

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=3
----
3

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-58095-46013 Otherwise, the UPDATE affects only those
# rows for which the WHERE clause boolean expression is true.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=1 WHERE y='unknown'

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=1
----
1

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-58129-20729 It is not an error if the WHERE clause does
# not evaluate to true for any row in the table - this just means that
# the UPDATE statement affects zero rows.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=1 WHERE y='foo'

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-40598-36595 For each affected row, the named columns
# are set to the values found by evaluating the corresponding scalar
# expressions.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=3+1

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=4
----
3

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-34751-18293 If a single column-name appears more than
# once in the list of assignment expressions, all but the rightmost
# occurrence is ignored.

skipif mssql
statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=3, x=4, x=5

skipif mssql
query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=3
----
0

skipif mssql
query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=4
----
0

skipif mssql
query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=5
----
3

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-40472-60438 Columns that do not appear in the list of
# assignments are left unmodified.

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE y='unknown'
----
1

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=2

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE y='unknown'
----
1

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-36239-04077 The scalar expressions may refer to columns
# of the row being updated.

# EVIDENCE-OF: R-04558-24451 In this case all scalar expressions are
# evaluated before any assignments are made.

statement ok
UPDATE t1 SET x=x+2

query I rowsort
SELECT count(*) FROM t1 WHERE x=4
----
3

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-12619-24112 The optional conflict-clause allows the
# user to nominate a specific constraint conflict resolution algorithm
# to use during this one UPDATE command.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-12123-54095 The table-name specified as part of an
# UPDATE statement within a trigger body must be unqualified.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-09690-36749 In other words, the database-name. prefix
# on the table name of the UPDATE is not allowed within triggers.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-06085-13761 Unless the table to which the trigger is
# attached is in the TEMP database, the table being updated by the
# trigger program must reside in the same database as it.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-29512-54644 If the table to which the trigger is
# attached is in the TEMP database, then the unqualified name of the
# table being updated is resolved in the same way as it is for a
# top-level statement (by searching first the TEMP database, then the
# main database, then any other databases in the order they were
# attached).

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-19619-42762 The INDEXED BY and NOT INDEXED clauses are
# not allowed on UPDATE statements within triggers.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-57359-59558 The LIMIT and ORDER BY clauses for UPDATE
# are unsupported within triggers, regardless of the compilation options
# used to build SQLite.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-59581-44104 If SQLite is built with the
# SQLITE_ENABLE_UPDATE_DELETE_LIMIT compile-time option then the syntax
# of the UPDATE statement is extended with optional ORDER BY and LIMIT
# clauses

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-58862-44169 If an UPDATE statement has a LIMIT clause,
# the maximum number of rows that will be updated is found by evaluating
# the accompanying expression and casting it to an integer value.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-63582-45120 A negative value is interpreted as "no
# limit".

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-18628-11938 If the LIMIT expression evaluates to
# non-negative value N and the UPDATE statement has an ORDER BY clause,
# then all rows that would be updated in the absence of the LIMIT clause
# are sorted according to the ORDER BY and the first N updated.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-30955-38324 If the UPDATE statement also has an OFFSET
# clause, then it is similarly evaluated and cast to an integer value.
# If the OFFSET expression evaluates to a non-negative value M, then the
# first M rows are skipped and the following N rows updated instead.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-19486-35828 If the UPDATE statement has no ORDER BY
# clause, then all rows that would be updated in the absence of the
# LIMIT clause are assembled in an arbitrary order before applying the
# LIMIT and OFFSET clauses to determine which are actually updated.

# TBD-EVIDENCE-OF: R-10927-26133 The ORDER BY clause on an UPDATE statement
# is used only to determine which rows fall within the LIMIT. The order
# in which rows are modified is arbitrary and is not influenced by the
# ORDER BY clause.