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Comment:Fixed typo.
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SHA1: e45a5a48412b62c628d5a17dba2bf60feb3488c8
User & Date: mihailim 2008-06-25 08:21:49
Context
2008-06-25
08:36
Fixed #1020. check-in: 391102d17f user: mihailim tags: trunk
08:21
Fixed typo. check-in: e45a5a4841 user: mihailim tags: trunk
07:58
Fixed #1798. check-in: f2a771ea80 user: mihailim tags: trunk
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  filesystems if you are not running the Share.exe daemon.  People who
  have a lot of experience with Windows tell me that file locking of
  network files is very buggy and is not dependable.  If what they
  say is true, sharing an SQLite database between two or more Windows
  machines might cause unexpected problems.</p>

  <p>We are aware of no other <i>embedded</i> SQL database engine that
  supports as much concurrancy as SQLite.  SQLite allows multiple processes
  to have the database file open at once, and for multiple processes to
  read the database at once.  When any process wants to write, it must
  lock the entire database file for the duration of its update.  But that
  normally only takes a few milliseconds.  Other processes just wait on
  the writer to finish then continue about their business.  Other embedded
  SQL database engines typically only allow a single process to connect to
  the database at once.</p>







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  filesystems if you are not running the Share.exe daemon.  People who
  have a lot of experience with Windows tell me that file locking of
  network files is very buggy and is not dependable.  If what they
  say is true, sharing an SQLite database between two or more Windows
  machines might cause unexpected problems.</p>

  <p>We are aware of no other <i>embedded</i> SQL database engine that
  supports as much concurrency as SQLite.  SQLite allows multiple processes
  to have the database file open at once, and for multiple processes to
  read the database at once.  When any process wants to write, it must
  lock the entire database file for the duration of its update.  But that
  normally only takes a few milliseconds.  Other processes just wait on
  the writer to finish then continue about their business.  Other embedded
  SQL database engines typically only allow a single process to connect to
  the database at once.</p>