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Overview
Comment:Minor English grammar changes.
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
Files: files | file ages | folders
SHA1: 543413f753689155c3cc18b4e5e1360596d59e19
User & Date: drh 2015-10-08 00:21:33
Context
2015-10-09
12:09
Fix typos in fts5.in. check-in: cc68da99a4 user: dan tags: trunk
2015-10-08
13:29
Proposed new version numbering scheme. Closed-Leaf check-in: 82a2560a88 user: drh tags: new-version-numbering
00:21
Minor English grammar changes. check-in: 543413f753 user: drh tags: trunk
2015-10-07
22:42
Fix a couple typos in the new docs. check-in: 255ed0fac7 user: mistachkin tags: trunk
Changes
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Changes to pages/json1.in.

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for JSON.

<p>
The "1" at the end of the name for the json1 extension is deliberate.
The designers anticipate that there will be future incompatible JSON
extensions building upon the lessons learned from json1.
Once sufficient experience is gained, some kind of
JSON extension might be folded into the SQLite core.  But for now,
JSON support remains an extension.

<h3>2.1 JSON arguments</h3>

<p>
For functions that accept JSON as their first argument, that argument
can be a JSON object, array, number, string, or null.  SQLite numeric
................................................................................
<p>
However, if a <i>value</i> argument come directly from the result of another
json1 function, then the argument is understood to be actual JSON and
the complete JSON is inserted rather than a quoted string.

<p>
For example, in the following call to json_object(), the <i>value</i>
argument looks like a well-formed JSON array.  But because it is just
ordinary SQL text it is interpreted as a literal string and added to the
result as a quoted string:

<tcl>
jexample {json_object('ex','[52,3.14159]')} {'{"ex":"[52,3.14159]"}'}
</tcl>

<p>







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...
219
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for JSON.

<p>
The "1" at the end of the name for the json1 extension is deliberate.
The designers anticipate that there will be future incompatible JSON
extensions building upon the lessons learned from json1.
Once sufficient experience is gained, some kind of
JSON extension might be folded into the SQLite core.  For now,
JSON support remains an extension.

<h3>2.1 JSON arguments</h3>

<p>
For functions that accept JSON as their first argument, that argument
can be a JSON object, array, number, string, or null.  SQLite numeric
................................................................................
<p>
However, if a <i>value</i> argument come directly from the result of another
json1 function, then the argument is understood to be actual JSON and
the complete JSON is inserted rather than a quoted string.

<p>
For example, in the following call to json_object(), the <i>value</i>
argument looks like a well-formed JSON array.  However, because it is just
ordinary SQL text, it is interpreted as a literal string and added to the
result as a quoted string:

<tcl>
jexample {json_object('ex','[52,3.14159]')} {'{"ex":"[52,3.14159]"}'}
</tcl>

<p>