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Comment:Update the code footprint numbers in the documentation (now 350KiB fully configured and 200KiB minimum).
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SHA1: 29d8f8e7c5541b428eef4ccbf2fea1ce076ef910
User & Date: drh 2011-09-15 12:43:53
Context
2011-09-16
21:41
Updates to the change log. check-in: 00154767d3 user: drh tags: trunk
2011-09-15
12:43
Update the code footprint numbers in the documentation (now 350KiB fully configured and 200KiB minimum). check-in: 29d8f8e7c5 user: drh tags: trunk
2011-09-12
18:29
Remove stray "(" character from the ON CONFLICT documentation. check-in: dd27f660f9 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to pages/about.in.

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architectures.  These features make SQLite a popular choice as
an <a href="whentouse.html#appfileformat">Application File Format</a>.
Think of SQLite not as a replacement for 
[http://www.oracle.com/database/index.html|Oracle] but
as a replacement for [http://man.he.net/man3/fopen|fopen()]</p>

<p>SQLite is a compact library.
With all features enabled, the library size can be less than 300KiB,
depending on compiler optimization settings.  (Some compiler optimizations

such as aggressive function inlining and loop unrolling can cause the
object code to be much larger.)  If optional features are omitted, the
size of the SQLite library can be reduced below 180KiB.  SQLite can also
be made to run in minimal stack space (4KiB) and
very little heap (100KiB), making SQLite a popular database engine 
choice on memory constrained gadgets such as cellphones, PDAs, and MP3 players.
There is a tradeoff between memory usage and speed.  
SQLite generally runs faster the more memory
you give it.  Nevertheless, performance is usually quite good even
in low-memory environments.</p>







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architectures.  These features make SQLite a popular choice as
an <a href="whentouse.html#appfileformat">Application File Format</a>.
Think of SQLite not as a replacement for 
[http://www.oracle.com/database/index.html|Oracle] but
as a replacement for [http://man.he.net/man3/fopen|fopen()]</p>

<p>SQLite is a compact library.
With all features enabled, the library size can be less than 350KiB,
depending on the target platform and compiler optimization settings.
(64-bit code is larger.  And some compiler optimizations
such as aggressive function inlining and loop unrolling can cause the
object code to be much larger.)  If optional features are omitted, the
size of the SQLite library can be reduced below 200KiB.  SQLite can also
be made to run in minimal stack space (4KiB) and
very little heap (100KiB), making SQLite a popular database engine 
choice on memory constrained gadgets such as cellphones, PDAs, and MP3 players.
There is a tradeoff between memory usage and speed.  
SQLite generally runs faster the more memory
you give it.  Nevertheless, performance is usually quite good even
in low-memory environments.</p>

Changes to pages/features.in.

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    (<a href="omitted.html">Features not supported</a>)</li>
<li>A complete database is stored in a 
    <a href="onefile.html">single cross-platform disk file</a>.</li>
<li>Supports terabyte-sized databases and gigabyte-sized strings
    and blobs.  (See <a href="limits.html">limits.html</a>.)
<li>Small code footprint: 
    <a href="http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/wiki?p=SizeOfSqlite">
    less than 325KiB</a> fully configured or less
    than 190KiB with optional features omitted.</li>
<li><a href="speed.html">Faster</a> than popular client/server database
    engines for most common operations.</li>
<li>Simple, easy to use <a href="c3ref/intro.html">API</a>.</li>
<li>Written in ANSI-C.  <a href="tclsqlite.html">TCL bindings</a> included.
    Bindings for dozens of other languages 
    <a href="http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/wiki?p=SqliteWrappers">
    available separately.</a></li>







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    (<a href="omitted.html">Features not supported</a>)</li>
<li>A complete database is stored in a 
    <a href="onefile.html">single cross-platform disk file</a>.</li>
<li>Supports terabyte-sized databases and gigabyte-sized strings
    and blobs.  (See <a href="limits.html">limits.html</a>.)
<li>Small code footprint: 
    <a href="http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/wiki?p=SizeOfSqlite">
    less than 350KiB</a> fully configured or less
    than 200KiB with optional features omitted.</li>
<li><a href="speed.html">Faster</a> than popular client/server database
    engines for most common operations.</li>
<li>Simple, easy to use <a href="c3ref/intro.html">API</a>.</li>
<li>Written in ANSI-C.  <a href="tclsqlite.html">TCL bindings</a> included.
    Bindings for dozens of other languages 
    <a href="http://www.sqlite.org/cvstrac/wiki?p=SqliteWrappers">
    available separately.</a></li>