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Comment:Add a new failure scenario to the howtocorrupt.html document.
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SHA1: 115b99a5d13a54b732165e04b4f24abba2e3d508
User & Date: drh 2011-04-12 18:46:13
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2011-04-12
19:31
Fix typos in the howtocorrupt.html document. check-in: ee071c325f user: drh tags: trunk
18:46
Add a new failure scenario to the howtocorrupt.html document. check-in: 115b99a5d1 user: drh tags: trunk
18:17
Add the "How To Corrupt And SQLite Database" document. check-in: bc040b36db user: drh tags: trunk
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database at the same time, resulting in database corruption.</p>

<p>Note that it is perfectly safe for two or more threads to access the
same SQLite database file using the SQLite library.  The unix drivers for
SQLite know about the POSIX advisory locking quirks and work around them.
This problem only arises when a thread tries to bypass the SQLite library
and read the database file directly.</p>

























<h3>2.3 Two processes using different locking protocols</h3>

<p>The default locking mechanism used by SQLite on unix platforms is
POSIX advisory locking, but there are other options.  By selecting an
alternative [sqlite3_vfs] using the [sqlite3_open_v2()] interface, an
application can make use of other locking protocols that might be more







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database at the same time, resulting in database corruption.</p>

<p>Note that it is perfectly safe for two or more threads to access the
same SQLite database file using the SQLite library.  The unix drivers for
SQLite know about the POSIX advisory locking quirks and work around them.
This problem only arises when a thread tries to bypass the SQLite library
and read the database file directly.</p>

<h4>2.2.1 Multiple copies of SQLite linked into the same application</h4>

<p>As pointed out in the previous paragraph, SQLite takes steps to work
around the quirks of POSIX advisory locking.  Part of that work-around involves
keeping a global list (mutex protected) of open SQLite database files.
But, if multiple copies of SQLite are linked into the same application,
then there will be multiple instances of this global list.
Database connections opened using one copy of the SQLite library
will be unaware of database connections opened using the other copy,
and will be unable to work around the POSIX advisory locking quirks.
A <tt>close()</tt> operation on one connection might unknowningly 
clear the locks on a different database connection, leading to database
corruption.</p>

<p>The scenario above sounds far-fetched.
But the SQLite developers are aware of at 
least one commercial product that was release
with exactly this bug.  The vendor came to the SQLite developers seeking
help in tracking down some infrequent database corruption issues they were
seeing on Linux and Mac.  The problem was eventually traced to the
fact that the appliation was linking against two separate copies of SQLite.
The solution was to change the application build procedures to link against
just one copy of SQLite instead of two.</p>

<h3>2.3 Two processes using different locking protocols</h3>

<p>The default locking mechanism used by SQLite on unix platforms is
POSIX advisory locking, but there are other options.  By selecting an
alternative [sqlite3_vfs] using the [sqlite3_open_v2()] interface, an
application can make use of other locking protocols that might be more