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Comment:Improvements to the sqlar.html page.
Timelines: family | ancestors | descendants | both | trunk
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SHA3-256: 0a2c8d8f26dec9900985c6b0ddeed51ea9c8fc99320e1f8bc1414b545c7bcd85
User & Date: drh 2018-03-10 15:27:44
Context
2018-03-10
18:40
Improvements to ZIP processing in the CLI document. Fix a hyperlink in the sqlar.html document. check-in: 23f1f44cc2 user: drh tags: trunk
15:27
Improvements to the sqlar.html page. check-in: 0a2c8d8f26 user: drh tags: trunk
12:09
Fix a typo in the zipfile.html document. check-in: 7accc324d8 user: drh tags: trunk
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Changes to pages/sqlar.in.

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The [https://fossil-scm.org/|Fossil Distributed Version Control] system
provides users with the option to download check-ins as either Tarballs,
ZIP Archives, or SQLite Archives.
<h1>Advantages Of SQLite Archives</h1>

<ol>
<li><p>
An SQLite Archive stores much more than a ZIP Archive or Tarball.
ZIP Archives and Tarballs are limited to storing only files.  An
SQLite Archive stores files but also whatever other tabular
and/or relational data seems useful to the application.

<li><p>
An SQLite Archive is transactional.
Updates are atomic and durable, even if there are unexpected crashes
or power losses in the middle of the update.
Readers see a consistent and unchanging version of the content even
is some other process is simultaneously updating the archive.

<li><p>
An SQLite Archive can be updated incrementally.
Individual files can be added or removed or replaced without having
................................................................................
in 2014.  ZIP Archives and Tarballs, on the other hand, have been around
for decades and are well-entrenched as standard formats.  Most programmers
know what a ZIP Archive or Tarball is, but if you say "SQLite Archive" you
are more likely to get a reply of "What?"  Tooling to process ZIP Archives
and Tarballs is more likely to be installed on stock computers.

<li><p>
Single an SQLite database is a more general format (it is designed to do
much more than simply store a bunch of files) it is not as compact as either
the ZIP Archive or Tarball formats.  An SQLite Achive is usually about 1%
larger than the equivalent ZIP Archive.  Tarballs are compressed as a single
unit rather than compressing each file separately as is done by both
SQLite and ZIP Archives.  For these reason, Tarballs tend to be much smaller
than either ZIP or SQLite Archives.











<li><p>
An SQLite Archive supports only the [https://zlib.net/|Deflate] compression
method.  Tarballs and ZIP Archive support a wider assortment of
compression methods.
</ol>








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The [https://fossil-scm.org/|Fossil Distributed Version Control] system
provides users with the option to download check-ins as either Tarballs,
ZIP Archives, or SQLite Archives.
<h1>Advantages Of SQLite Archives</h1>

<ol>
<li><p>
An SQLite Archive is flexible.
ZIP Archives and Tarballs are limited to storing only files.  An
SQLite Archive stores files plus whatever other tabular
and/or relational data seems useful to the application.

<li><p>
An SQLite Archive is transactional.
Updates are atomic and durable, even if there are crashes
or power losses in the middle of the update.
Readers see a consistent and unchanging version of the content even
is some other process is simultaneously updating the archive.

<li><p>
An SQLite Archive can be updated incrementally.
Individual files can be added or removed or replaced without having
................................................................................
in 2014.  ZIP Archives and Tarballs, on the other hand, have been around
for decades and are well-entrenched as standard formats.  Most programmers
know what a ZIP Archive or Tarball is, but if you say "SQLite Archive" you
are more likely to get a reply of "What?"  Tooling to process ZIP Archives
and Tarballs is more likely to be installed on stock computers.

<li><p>
Since an SQLite database is a more general format (it is designed to do
much more than simply store a bunch of files) it is not as compact as either
the ZIP Archive or Tarball formats.  An SQLite Achive is usually about 1%
larger than the equivalent ZIP Archive.  Tarballs are compressed as a single
unit rather than compressing each file separately as is done by both
SQLite and ZIP Archives.  For these reason, Tarballs tend to be smaller
than either ZIP or SQLite Archives.
<p>
As an example, the following table show the relative sizes for an
SQLite Archive, a ZIP Archive, and a Tarball of the 1,743 files
in the SQLite 3.22.0 source tree:
<table striped=1>
  <tr><td>SQLite Archive<td>10,754,048
  <tr><td>ZIP Archive (using Info-ZIP 3.0)<td>10,662,365
  <tr><td>ZIP Archive (using [zipfile])<td>10,390,215
  <tr><td>Tarball<td>&#x2007;9,781,109
</table>

<li><p>
An SQLite Archive supports only the [https://zlib.net/|Deflate] compression
method.  Tarballs and ZIP Archive support a wider assortment of
compression methods.
</ol>