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SHA1 Hash:ef8f1ed84593558fdca2fa432f12b6f4c12ae7df
Date: 2014-05-30 18:01:46
User: mistachkin
Comment:Add a section describing the Win32 native memory allocator.
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of newly allocated memory and that memory allocations are not used after
they have been freed.</p>

<p>The heavy wrapper employed by [SQLITE_MEMDEBUG] is intended for use
only during testing, analysis, and debugging of SQLite.  The heavy wrapper
has a significant performance and memory overhead and probably should not
be used in production.</p>













<tcl>hd_fragment memsys5 *memsys5 {zero-malloc memory allocator}</tcl>
<h4>3.1.3 Zero-malloc memory allocator</h4>

<p>When SQLite is compiled with the [SQLITE_ENABLE_MEMSYS5] option, an
alternative memory allocator that does not use malloc() is included in the
build.  The SQLite developers refer to this alternative memory allocator
as "memsys5".  Even when it is included in the build, memsys5 is 
disabled by default.
To enable memsys5, the application must invoke the following SQLite 
................................................................................
requests are rounded up to a power of two and the request is satisfied
by the first free slot in pBuf that is large enough.  Adjacent freed
allocations are coalesced using a buddy system. When used appropriately,
this algorithm provides mathematical guarantees against fragmentation and
breakdown, as described further <a href="#nofrag">below</a>.</p>

<tcl>hd_fragment memsysx {experimental memory allocators}</tcl>
<h4>3.1.4 Experimental memory allocators</h4>

<p>The name "memsys5" used for the zero-malloc memory allocator implies
that there are several additional memory allocators available, and indeed
there are.  The default memory allocator is "memsys1".  The debugging
memory allocator is "memsys2".  Those have already been covered.</p>

<p>If SQLite is compiled with [SQLITE_ENABLE_MEMSYS3] than another
................................................................................
[version 3.6.5].</p>

<p>Other experimental memory allocators might be added in future releases
of SQLite.  One may anticipate that these will be called memsys7, memsys8,
and so forth.</p>

<a name="appalloc"></a>
<h4>3.1.5 Application-defined memory allocators</h4>

<p>New memory allocators do not have to be part of the SQLite source tree
nor included in the sqlite3.c [amalgamation].  Individual applications can
supply their own memory allocators to SQLite at start-time.</p>

<p>To cause SQLite to use a new memory allocator, the application
simply calls:</p>
................................................................................

<p>In a multi-threaded application, access to the [sqlite3_mem_methods]
is serialized if and only if [SQLITE_CONFIG_MEMSTATUS] is enabled.
If [SQLITE_CONFIG_MEMSTATUS] is disabled then the methods in
[sqlite3_mem_methods] must take care of their own serialization needs.</p>

<a name="overlayalloc"></a>
<h4>3.1.6 Memory allocator overlays</h4>

<p>An application can insert layers or "overlays" in between the
SQLite core and the underlying memory allocator.
For example, the <a href="#oomtesting">out-of-memory test logic</a>
for SQLite uses an overlay that can simulate memory allocation
failures.</p>

................................................................................
The existing allocator is saved by the overlay and is used as
a fallback to do real memory allocation.  Then the overlay is
inserted in place of the existing memory allocator using
the [sqlite3_config]([SQLITE_CONFIG_MALLOC],...) as described
<a href="#appalloc">above</a>.

<a name="stuballoc"></a>
<h4>3.1.7 No-op memory allocator stub</h4>

<p>If SQLite is compiled with the [SQLITE_ZERO_MALLOC] option, then
the [default memory allocator] is omitted and replaced by a stub
memory allocator that never allocates any memory.  Any calls to the
stub memory allocator will report back that no memory is available.</p>

<p>The no-op memory allocator is not useful by itself.  It exists only








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of newly allocated memory and that memory allocations are not used after
they have been freed.</p>

<p>The heavy wrapper employed by [SQLITE_MEMDEBUG] is intended for use
only during testing, analysis, and debugging of SQLite.  The heavy wrapper
has a significant performance and memory overhead and probably should not
be used in production.</p>

<tcl>hd_fragment win32heap {Win32 native memory allocator}</tcl>
<h4>3.1.3 The Win32 native memory allocator</h4>

<p>If SQLite is compiled for Windows with the [SQLITE_WIN32_MALLOC]
compile-time option, then a different, thin wrapper is used around
HeapAlloc(), HeapReAlloc(), and HeapFree().  The thin wrapper uses the
configured SQLite heap, which will be different from the default process
heap if the [SQLITE_WIN32_HEAP_CREATE] compile-time option is used.  In
addition, when an allocation is made or freed, HeapValidate() will be
called if SQLite is compiled with assert() enabled and the
[SQLITE_WIN32_MALLOC_VALIDATE] compile-time option.</p>

<tcl>hd_fragment memsys5 *memsys5 {zero-malloc memory allocator}</tcl>
<h4>3.1.4 Zero-malloc memory allocator</h4>

<p>When SQLite is compiled with the [SQLITE_ENABLE_MEMSYS5] option, an
alternative memory allocator that does not use malloc() is included in the
build.  The SQLite developers refer to this alternative memory allocator
as "memsys5".  Even when it is included in the build, memsys5 is 
disabled by default.
To enable memsys5, the application must invoke the following SQLite 
................................................................................
requests are rounded up to a power of two and the request is satisfied
by the first free slot in pBuf that is large enough.  Adjacent freed
allocations are coalesced using a buddy system. When used appropriately,
this algorithm provides mathematical guarantees against fragmentation and
breakdown, as described further <a href="#nofrag">below</a>.</p>

<tcl>hd_fragment memsysx {experimental memory allocators}</tcl>
<h4>3.1.5 Experimental memory allocators</h4>

<p>The name "memsys5" used for the zero-malloc memory allocator implies
that there are several additional memory allocators available, and indeed
there are.  The default memory allocator is "memsys1".  The debugging
memory allocator is "memsys2".  Those have already been covered.</p>

<p>If SQLite is compiled with [SQLITE_ENABLE_MEMSYS3] than another
................................................................................
[version 3.6.5].</p>

<p>Other experimental memory allocators might be added in future releases
of SQLite.  One may anticipate that these will be called memsys7, memsys8,
and so forth.</p>

<a name="appalloc"></a>
<h4>3.1.6 Application-defined memory allocators</h4>

<p>New memory allocators do not have to be part of the SQLite source tree
nor included in the sqlite3.c [amalgamation].  Individual applications can
supply their own memory allocators to SQLite at start-time.</p>

<p>To cause SQLite to use a new memory allocator, the application
simply calls:</p>
................................................................................

<p>In a multi-threaded application, access to the [sqlite3_mem_methods]
is serialized if and only if [SQLITE_CONFIG_MEMSTATUS] is enabled.
If [SQLITE_CONFIG_MEMSTATUS] is disabled then the methods in
[sqlite3_mem_methods] must take care of their own serialization needs.</p>

<a name="overlayalloc"></a>
<h4>3.1.7 Memory allocator overlays</h4>

<p>An application can insert layers or "overlays" in between the
SQLite core and the underlying memory allocator.
For example, the <a href="#oomtesting">out-of-memory test logic</a>
for SQLite uses an overlay that can simulate memory allocation
failures.</p>

................................................................................
The existing allocator is saved by the overlay and is used as
a fallback to do real memory allocation.  Then the overlay is
inserted in place of the existing memory allocator using
the [sqlite3_config]([SQLITE_CONFIG_MALLOC],...) as described
<a href="#appalloc">above</a>.

<a name="stuballoc"></a>
<h4>3.1.8 No-op memory allocator stub</h4>

<p>If SQLite is compiled with the [SQLITE_ZERO_MALLOC] option, then
the [default memory allocator] is omitted and replaced by a stub
memory allocator that never allocates any memory.  Any calls to the
stub memory allocator will report back that no memory is available.</p>

<p>The no-op memory allocator is not useful by itself.  It exists only