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SHA1 Hash:8a8b9f4250845c42d8dce6c82f9b106c48b13d82
Date: 2013-03-09 15:12:39
User: drh
Comment:Fix various documentation typos.
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Changes to pages/books.in

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Publisher: Apress<br>
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1430232250">Amazon</a></p>

<p>
Outside of the world of enterprise computing, there is one database 
that enables a huge range of software and hardware to flex relational 
database capabilities, without the baggage and cost of traditional 
database management systems. That database is SQLite\u2014an embeddable
database with an amazingly small footprint, yet able to handle databases 
of enormous size. SQLite comes equipped with an array of powerful 
features available through a host of programming and development 
environments. It is supported by languages such as C, Java, Perl,
PHP, Python, Ruby, TCL, and more.</p>

<p><i>The Definitive Guide to SQLite, Second Edition</i> 







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Publisher: Apress<br>
<a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1430232250">Amazon</a></p>

<p>
Outside of the world of enterprise computing, there is one database 
that enables a huge range of software and hardware to flex relational 
database capabilities, without the baggage and cost of traditional 
database management systems. That database is SQLite - an embeddable
database with an amazingly small footprint, yet able to handle databases 
of enormous size. SQLite comes equipped with an array of powerful 
features available through a host of programming and development 
environments. It is supported by languages such as C, Java, Perl,
PHP, Python, Ruby, TCL, and more.</p>

<p><i>The Definitive Guide to SQLite, Second Edition</i> 

Changes to pages/faq.in

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  <p>Note that the integer key is one greater than the largest
  key that was in the table just prior to the insert.  The new key
  will be unique over all keys currently in the table, but it might
  overlap with keys that have been previously deleted from the
  table.  To create keys that are unique over the lifetime of the
  table, add the [AUTOINCREMENT] keyword to the [INTEGER PRIMARY KEY]
  declaration.  Then the key chosen will be one more than than the
  largest key that has ever existed in that table.  If the largest
  possible key has previously existed in that table, then the [INSERT]
  will fail with an [SQLITE_FULL] error code.</p>
}

faq {
  What datatypes does SQLite support?
................................................................................
  <p>An [SQLITE_SCHEMA] error is returned when a 
  prepared SQL statement is no longer valid and cannot be executed.
  When this occurs, the statement must be recompiled from SQL using 
  the [sqlite3_prepare()] API.
  An SQLITE_SCHEMA error can only occur when using the [sqlite3_prepare()],
  and [sqlite3_step()] interfaces to run SQL.
  You will never receive an [SQLITE_SCHEMA] error from
  [sqlite3_exec()].  Nor will you receive a the error if you
  prepare statements using [sqlite3_prepare_v2()] instead of
  [sqlite3_prepare()].</p>

  <p>The [sqlite3_prepare_v2()] interface creates a
  [prepared statement] that will automatically recompile itself if
  the schema changes.  The easiest way to deal with
  [SQLITE_SCHEMA] errors is to always use [sqlite3_prepare_v2()]







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  <p>Note that the integer key is one greater than the largest
  key that was in the table just prior to the insert.  The new key
  will be unique over all keys currently in the table, but it might
  overlap with keys that have been previously deleted from the
  table.  To create keys that are unique over the lifetime of the
  table, add the [AUTOINCREMENT] keyword to the [INTEGER PRIMARY KEY]
  declaration.  Then the key chosen will be one more than the
  largest key that has ever existed in that table.  If the largest
  possible key has previously existed in that table, then the [INSERT]
  will fail with an [SQLITE_FULL] error code.</p>
}

faq {
  What datatypes does SQLite support?
................................................................................
  <p>An [SQLITE_SCHEMA] error is returned when a 
  prepared SQL statement is no longer valid and cannot be executed.
  When this occurs, the statement must be recompiled from SQL using 
  the [sqlite3_prepare()] API.
  An SQLITE_SCHEMA error can only occur when using the [sqlite3_prepare()],
  and [sqlite3_step()] interfaces to run SQL.
  You will never receive an [SQLITE_SCHEMA] error from
  [sqlite3_exec()].  Nor will you receive an error if you
  prepare statements using [sqlite3_prepare_v2()] instead of
  [sqlite3_prepare()].</p>

  <p>The [sqlite3_prepare_v2()] interface creates a
  [prepared statement] that will automatically recompile itself if
  the schema changes.  The easiest way to deal with
  [SQLITE_SCHEMA] errors is to always use [sqlite3_prepare_v2()]

Changes to pages/malloc.in

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reducing memory requirements.  This is particularly important for the
page cache memory since the page cache constitutes the largest component
of the memory needs of SQLite.
</p></li>
</ul>

<p>The page-cache memory allocator is disabled by default.
An application can enabled it at start-time as follows:</p>

<blockquote><pre>
[sqlite3_config]([SQLITE_CONFIG_PAGECACHE], pBuf, sz, N);
</pre></blockquote>

<p>The pBuf parameter is a pointer to a contiguous range of bytes that
SQLite will use for page-cache memory allocations.  The buffer must be







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reducing memory requirements.  This is particularly important for the
page cache memory since the page cache constitutes the largest component
of the memory needs of SQLite.
</p></li>
</ul>

<p>The page-cache memory allocator is disabled by default.
An application can enable it at start-time as follows:</p>

<blockquote><pre>
[sqlite3_config]([SQLITE_CONFIG_PAGECACHE], pBuf, sz, N);
</pre></blockquote>

<p>The pBuf parameter is a pointer to a contiguous range of bytes that
SQLite will use for page-cache memory allocations.  The buffer must be

Changes to pages/vtab.in

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     file
<li> Access to the filesystem of the host computer
<li> Enabling SQL manipulation of data in statistics packages like R
</ul>

<h3>1.1 Usage</h3>

<p>A virtual table is created using using a [CREATE VIRTUAL TABLE] statement.
This statement creates a table with a particular name and associates the
table with a "module".

<blockquote><pre>
   CREATE VIRTUAL TABLE tablename USING modulename;
</pre></blockquote>








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     file
<li> Access to the filesystem of the host computer
<li> Enabling SQL manipulation of data in statistics packages like R
</ul>

<h3>1.1 Usage</h3>

<p>A virtual table is created using a [CREATE VIRTUAL TABLE] statement.
This statement creates a table with a particular name and associates the
table with a "module".

<blockquote><pre>
   CREATE VIRTUAL TABLE tablename USING modulename;
</pre></blockquote>